Storm Safety Resources

// Katie Rynard on Friday September 8, 2017

Hurricane season has officially reached the halfway point, and this year's active season has already caused much devastation.

Whether you're dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, are bracing yourself for Hurricane Irma, or are facing other storm damage and flooding, reviewing these safety resources can help ensure you, your loved ones and your organization are ready:

Hurricane Preparedness & Response will help you familiarize yourself with hurricane terminology and get your facility ready to weather the storm.

Emergency Shelter Preparedness highlights what you need to do if your organization decides to open its doors to those in your community who are impacted by natural disasters.

Steps to Take After a Storm is a checklist that will walk you through filing a claim, assessing damage and cleaning up.

Protecting Property & Equipment After a Storm, from Hartford Steam Boiler, GuideOne's equipment breakdown reinsurer, describes the appropriate steps to take before using any equipment, machinery or electrical systems that have been exposed to flood waters.

GuideOne's thoughts and prayers continue to be with everyone impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard is a Corporate Communications Specialist at GuideOne Insurance.

When she's not at work, she enjoys decorating, traveling, trying new restaurants and spending time with her husband, daughter and dachshund puppy.

The Do’s and Don’ts Before, During and After a Hurricane

// Taylor Vivant on Tuesday September 15, 2015

Last week, in honor of National Preparedness Month, we offered you some great tips for preventing wildfires and remaining safe when they occur. To offer insight on another natural disaster, this week, we’ll cover hurricanes, one of the most destructive weather catastrophes. 

The Gulf coast recently recognized the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a storm that claimed the lives of more than 1,800 people, and destroyed countless homes, buildings and communities. Katrina serves as a great reminder of how powerful these storms can be, and why it’s important to adequately prepare for hurricanes of all sizes, taking action before, during and after the storm. 

Before a Hurricane

  • Create a family emergency plan that addresses emergency contact information, evacuation routes and emergency or medical supplies;
  • Build an emergency kit  with basic household items that could be useful in an emergency;
  • Know the elevation level at your location and identify local hazards in your area that could pose a flood threat;
  • Add a protective layer over windows, such as permanent storm shutters or 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood;
  • Fasten the roof to the frame structure with straps or additional clips;
  • Trim trees and brushes around the property to create more wind resistance and clean gutters and downspouts to prevent clogging; and
  • Install a generator for emergencies.

During the Storm

  • Do not venture out into the storm;
  • Stay alert and informed by watching the TV or listening to a NOAA weather radio;
  • Do not evacuate unless instructed by officials;
  • Turn off propane tanks;
  • Turn any refrigerators to its coldest temperature;
  • Stay away from windows and electrical equipment; and
  • Close all interior doors and secure and brace external doors.

After a Hurricane

  • Continue to listen to local radio stations or a NOAA weather radio;
  • Do not drive unless it is necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges;
  • Do not return to your home or building until authorities have indicated it is safe to do so;
  • Carefully inspect for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damages;
  • Do not enter a building if you can smell gas, see floodwaters or damage caused by fire; and
  • Take photos of any identified damage for insurance purposes.

For more information about hurricane preparation and safety, visit Ready.gov/hurricanes

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant is a member of the Corporate Communications and Marketing team at GuideOne Insurance, where she assists in a variety of projects and tasks.

Away from work, she enjoys being active outdoors, adventuring with her friends and planning her next vacation.