Church Security: You Ask, We Answer

// Abby Connolly on Monday December 18, 2017

Although churches are often viewed as safe havens, they can be vulnerable to devastating violent acts, just like other businesses and organizations. Identifying the warning signs of a violent situation, knowing the best practices for protecting your church and getting fellow church members on board with increased safety and security efforts can seem overwhelming.

These topics and more were discussed in a recent webinar held by GuideOne Insurance. As you’ll see below, webinar participants asked thoughtful questions. Brian Gleason, senior risk manager at GuideOne, and Carl Chinn, independent church security consultant, have the answers to these questions.

Q: Throughout the webinar, you mentioned DLR. What does that mean?

A: DLR is an acronym for “Doesn’t Look Right”. This is a description of a person or situation that is out of the ordinary or suspicious.

Q: During incident collection, do you also track whether or not the aggressor had a relationship to the church or a member in the church, or if the aggressor was strictly a stranger?

A: The current statistics show that approximately 22% of aggressors are directly related to the church.

Q: What are the insurance implications of granting permission to carry concealed weapons in the church?

A: Anytime you allow or encourage the use of firearms in your organization you are essentially giving permission for your representative to take a person’s life. This should be done only after a thorough review of the ramifications. More information regarding concealed carry can be found here.

Q: How do we influence others in the congregation to understand the need for a safety ministry? Our congregation doesn’t see the need for an organized ministry and doesn’t want to be involved.

A: We recommend starting with the church’s leadership. Without leadership buy-in, no program will be effective. You can start with a conversation about the shepherd’s duty to care for the flock and the statistics provided in the webinar.

Q: Where do we go for local and regional safety defense and reporting compliances?

A: A good place to start is your local law enforcement agency and district attorney. They can give you a clear picture of the legal landscape in your area.

Q: Define your ideal security team.  In a very small church where a police presence might not be feasible, what would you suggest?

A: A good first step is identifying a couple of people to specifically be eyes and ears. Place one inside and one outside during events and services to be aware of what’s happening on church grounds.

Q: How frequently should training occur?

A: Do some kind of training at least once a month – even if it is 15 minutes before service time. Make it a team practice to read the “Think About It” article once a week at carlchinn.com.

Q: How do you address large bags or boxes?

A: Bags are a regular item at church services (diaper bags, large purses, oxygen bottles). We recommend first establishing a threat intelligence program for your church. If the threat level reaches the highest category (whether a known threat in the area or specific to your church), have a “no-bags allowed” status only for that event.

Q: How many safety personnel do you recommend to be available on a given day, and should they be placed in any particular place?

A: The number and placement of security personnel depends on the size, location and nature of the event, as well as any known threats. If you only have two people, one should be assigned to the outside. Beyond that, positions vary. Ratios are being defined by a study of the Faith Based Security Network, but until the study is complete, the estimate is 1% of the congregation on active duty at any given time for events with over 1,000 attendees, 1-3% for events with 100 - 1,000 attendees and 2-4% (but never less than two individuals) of crowds of 100 or less. Regardless, we are not talking a large amount of people dedicated to just patrol. But all teachers and volunteers should be on alert and know who to call.

Q: How well have you trained your staff on first aid/trauma care? 

A: Training and supplies for the medical portion should be as much, if not more, of a focus than training and equipment for the protection team. Any team will deal with medical emergencies more frequently than violent crime. Recruit people who are already medically certified, and if that is not feasible, send trainable people through your area Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program.

Miss the webinar? We know life gets busy, so we made sure to record it for you. Along with the webinar recording, you can download valuable resources on church security and violence prevention.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Abby Connolly

Abby Connolly

Abby Connolly is a Marketing Strategy Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on the design and implementation of the church marketing plan, co-op advertising program, and direct mail campaigns.

When she’s not at work, she enjoys riding her bike on the Des Moines trails, spending time with her fiancé and two dogs, and going to the movies.

Holiday Service Safety Considerations

// Lindsay Taylor on Friday December 15, 2017

Christmas services are among the highest-attended services of the year, presenting an exciting opportunity to celebrate and worship with a larger audience. With the increased number of services and attendees, you’ll want to make safety a top priority. Here are some pointers to help you plan for your large gathering.

Review your safety plan. Take a moment to revisit the safety plan you have established for your church. Review all procedures with your staff and volunteers to make sure that they know how to respond in the event of an emergency.

Determine logistics. With so many people in attendance, it's especially important to make sure that you have a game plan for the day – and that this plan is clearly communicated to staff and volunteers. Here are some details to consider:

  • Will you allow people to roam the facility or will you close off certain parts (e.g., church offices, classrooms, the gym or cafeteria)?
  • What time will the services start?
  • When will you start letting people in?
  • Which doors will you allow people to enter through?
  • Do you have enough seating and supplies (bulletins, candles, etc.) available?

Tip – It’s a good idea to have extra greeters and ushers available to assist people, since more nonmembers and out-of-town guests will be in attendance and may need more guidance and assistance.

Know your maximum occupancy. Going over this number can make for a squished, uncomfortable service – and create a safety risk in the event of an emergency.

Tip – Consider setting up overflow seating in a gym or fellowship hall with live video feeds of the services on TVs or projectors. This will allow more people to attend your service without it creating a safety risk.

Avoid slips and falls. There’s something special about a white Christmas, but you’ll want to be extra careful to limit slippery surfaces. Clear walking surfaces of snow and ice, and increase traction indoors by placing sturdy mats and runners at entrances.

Decorate with care.  Make sure that trees, manger scenes and other decorations do not block means of egress.

Step up security. Increased attendance also increases the potential threat of crime and violence, so make sure appropriate security measures are in place. Check out our post 4 Ways to Step Up Security at Holiday Events for ideas on how to do that.

Safely bask in the glow. The tips in this post will help ensure your candlelight service remains peaceful, not perilous.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor is a Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on marketing communications and the co-op program.

In her free time, she enjoys dancing, running and spending time with friends and family.

How to Prepare for the Possibility of Violence

// Eric Spacek, JD, ARM on Wednesday October 25, 2017

A church is often viewed as a safe haven. Not only by the congregation members, staff and volunteers, but by the community it’s a part of.  However, today’s reality proves that shootings and violent outbreaks are more commonplace and churches aren’t excluded from them. Most recently, the Antioch, Tennessee, church shooting that occurred on Sunday, Sept. 24, demonstrates that violent incidents may occur at any time and churches are vulnerable to such acts.

Shocking as it may seem, violent incidents like the one in Tennessee happen several times each year at churches across the country.  And while it’s not a pleasant topic to discuss, churches need to prepare themselves in case a violent act does occur.  Below are some suggestions on how to make your church and its members less vulnerable.

How to Make Your Church Less Vulnerable

  • If you don’t already have one, create a church Safety and Security Team. Designate a point person on security issues to be the security director and define the responsibilities of that position.
  • Conduct a security assessment to identify your church’s vulnerabilities. Ideally, the assessment would be conducted in conjunction with your local law enforcement agency.
  • Develop a church security plan with defined roles for all staff, including greeters, ushers and other frontline workers and volunteers.
  • Within your church security plan, include a seating location for all security personnel, lockdown procedures, crisis communications and an evacuation plan.
  • If appropriate for the size of your church, have walkie-talkies, pagers and/or radios on hand so that you may effectively communicate any issues or concerns.
  • Establish a no tolerance policy for fights, altercations and other disruptions.
  • Work with local law enforcement to provide training for staff and volunteers on topics such as dealing with disruptive individuals and identifying and diffusing potentially violent situations.
  • Understand the rules and limitations of a concealed carry weapons permit (CCW) and what your rights as a church are in allowing a member or visitor to bring their firearm to church.

How to Make Your Church Members Less Vulnerable

  • Never allow staff to work alone.  Always ensure that there are at least two employees present at all times.
  • Establish an internal distress code that will alert others in the office to your need for assistance.  For example, if your members typically address each other by first name, your distress code could be addressing a colleague by his/her last name (i.e., “Ms. Smith”).
  • Keep all church doors locked except when in use and limit access points as much as possible.
  • Make sure all church staff members know of and understand the church’s security plan.

The best way to address violence is to be prepared. There is no assurance that a violent episode can be avoided.  However, you can prepare for the possibility of an incident occurring and therefore react to a deadly situation in a more timely manner, potentially saving lives.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Space, JD, ARM is the Director of Risk Management and Loss Control at GuideOne Insurance in West Des Moines, Iowa.  Before joining GuideOne, he served as Minister of Operations for a large Methodist church in Raleigh, N.C., and was a liability litigation trial attorney in Washington, D.C.

Storm Safety Resources

// Katie Rynard on Friday September 8, 2017

Hurricane season has officially reached the halfway point, and this year's active season has already caused much devastation.

Whether you're dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, are bracing yourself for Hurricane Irma, or are facing other storm damage and flooding, reviewing these safety resources can help ensure you, your loved ones and your organization are ready:

Hurricane Preparedness & Response will help you familiarize yourself with hurricane terminology and get your facility ready to weather the storm.

Emergency Shelter Preparedness highlights what you need to do if your organization decides to open its doors to those in your community who are impacted by natural disasters.

Steps to Take After a Storm is a checklist that will walk you through filing a claim, assessing damage and cleaning up.

Protecting Property & Equipment After a Storm, from Hartford Steam Boiler, GuideOne's equipment breakdown reinsurer, describes the appropriate steps to take before using any equipment, machinery or electrical systems that have been exposed to flood waters.

GuideOne's thoughts and prayers continue to be with everyone impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard is a Corporate Communications Specialist at GuideOne Insurance.

When she's not at work, she enjoys decorating, traveling, trying new restaurants and spending time with her husband, daughter and dachshund puppy.

Team Up With Your Local Law Enforcement

// Brian Gleason on Tuesday August 29, 2017

A regular police presence at or near your school, church and/or local neighborhood is a valuable crime-prevention strategy. In schools specifically, it can disrupt trouble spots that interfere with students traveling to and from school, prevent strangers from entering schools, identify students who are selling drugs or are under the influence of drugs, and more.

Additionally, the routine patrolling of school and church grounds better positions law enforcement to act quickly when they receive a request for help and builds a level of comfort for both the organization and the authorities. A rapid and fluid response is critical in a situation where many people are in harm’s way.

Ready to build that relationship? Here are some ways you can meet and support your local law enforcement.

Establish a working relationship with your local police. Encourage your local law enforcement to visit your facility. The worst time and place to meet your local authorities is over the hood of their patrol cars when they are responding to an incident. Build relationships early and work together on response plans.

Invite officers to visit and make them comfortable. Let officers know that they are welcome to come in and use your restroom and grab a cup of coffee in between calls. Additionally, having an officer sit in his or her patrol car while writing reports on your grounds is a great crime deterrent and builds goodwill.

Offer your facilities for training opportunities. Law enforcement agencies are often looking for locations to host classroom lectures, active shooter drills and other training sessions. What’s in it for you? Officers will learn the layout of your facility, build a relationship with your organization and offer valuable skills to your people and the public. It’s a win-win for both parties.

Hold a “Coffee with a Cop” or “Pizza with Police” event. This type of casual forum encourages members of your organization to meet the officers who patrol your facility. Officers can provide information on enforcement activities, crime prevention and response plans for the neighborhood and your organization.

Invite officers to participate in school activities. Including officers in your activities (as coaches in after-school programs, mentors for at-risk youth, judges in your pie-eating contest, etc.) helps to develop partnerships with your organization and puts law enforcement in a positive light. Juvenile authorities and police both have specialized training in working with youth and can become involved directly with students outside the police station, courtroom or other correctional setting. They often develop a good relationship with students as a means of preventing a confrontation in the future. As the relationship builds, students see police and juvenile authorities as positive role models – and this broad respect for authority is essential in preventing crime. 

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Brian Gleason

Brian Gleason

Brian Gleason is the Senior Risk Manager for Education at GuideOne Insurance, providing resources and consulting services to GuideOne clients in the education niche. Prior to his career at GuideOne, Brian spent twenty years in risk management for a Christian university in California. Brian has his MBA along with years of experience in insurance, enterprise risk management, occupational health and safety and emergency preparedness and response. 

Lightning Safety Essentials

// Meghan Walters on Thursday June 22, 2017

Baseball, barbecues, beaches and ice cream dripping down your cone – these are the things we like to think about in the summer. This week, the National Lightning Safety Council is making sure that’s all you have to think about with their annual National Lightning Safety Awareness Week.

Lightning may not have the destructive power of a hurricane, but that false sense of security has made it one of the leading causes of weather-related deaths. Make sure your summer is safe and fun for everyone by familiarizing yourself with the danger lightning can pose. If nothing else, just remember: When thunder roars, go indoors!

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Meghan Walters

Meghan Walters

Meghan Walters is a Corporate Communications and Marketing Intern at GuideOne Insurance.

In addition to working at GuideOne, Meghan is a student at Drake University who enjoys hiking, cooking, traveling and finding the best places to eat in the Des Moines area. 

Gearing Up for Summer Youth Activities

// Lindsay Taylor on Tuesday June 6, 2017

As the school year comes to a close, summer activities are ramping up. If your organization is planning events for the youth in your community – Vacation Bible School, camps, daycare and family activities – there are many safety considerations to think about before day one. Here are some things to keep in mind:  

Revisiting Your Safety Plan – Summer youth activities usually bring an influx of kids to your organization. With the increase in turnout, it’s more important than ever to ensure you have a proper safety plan in place so your event team knows how to respond to allergic reactions, injuries, inclement weather and other emergency situations. If you do already have one in place, be sure to double-check it and update as needed. Your safety plan might include the following sections: 

  • Emergency evacuation procedures
  • Severe weather procedures
  • Intruder procedures
  • Sexual misconduct and abuse prevention
  • First-aid procedures

If you don’t have a safety plan in place, check out this resource for guidance on what your safety plan should include.

Screening Employees and Volunteers – Employees and volunteers are key contributors to running successful activities. However, before hiring employees or accepting volunteers to work these events, it is crucial that you run proper background checks on them. Background checks deter criminals and sexual predators, can reveal criminal history and provide peace of mind. This resource helps you navigate background screenings.

Taking Precautionary Measures – The last thing you want at your events is an accident that results in injury or damage to occur. There are a number of precautionary measures that your organization, employees and volunteers can take in order to reduce the chance of this happening, and this article outlines what you can do to help protect participants and enjoy a fun-filled, accident-free summer.  

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor is a Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on marketing communications and the co-op program.

In her free time, she enjoys dancing, running and spending time with friends and family.

Protecting Your House of Worship from the Threat of Terrorism

// Eric Spacek, JD, ARM on Tuesday April 11, 2017

This past weekend, two churches in Egypt were bombed during Palm Sunday services. The bombings killed more than 40 people and injured more than 100. Although these tragic incidents took place thousands of miles away, they serve as an important reminder of the ever-relevant threat of terrorism by violent extremists, and why it’s important to take this issue seriously.

This article, originally posted in June 2016, helps raise awareness of the threat of terrorism and the steps your organization can take to protect staff and members.

As places of public gathering without extensive security protection, churches and houses of worship are generally considered “soft targets,” much like shopping malls, restaurants, stores and theaters. The Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary defines a soft target as “a person or thing that is relatively unprotected or vulnerable, especially to military or terrorist attack.”

Even in times of tragedy, your church doesn’t have to feel helpless against threats of terrorism. A few key actions – education, assessment and planning – can help your organization prepare for potential threats.

Education
Understand the threat of terrorism, which may vary by the geographical location of your facility. In addition to mass shootings, terrorist attacks also may include explosive devices, chemical or biological threats, nuclear or radiological dispersion devices, and cyber-attacks. General information on the terrorism threat is available on the Department of Homeland Security’s website. While terrorist attacks with chemical, biological, nuclear or radiological agents are possible, the likelihood of such events occurring at your facility is not high. Thus, it makes sense to broaden your plan to consider the range of emergency situations that could take place.

Assessment
An important starting point is to identify the potential hazards that your organization faces and assess your vulnerability to them. While the threat of terrorism is real, be sure to also assess the common emergency situations that your organization is more likely to face, such as medical emergencies, fires, extreme weather and natural disasters, as well as an active shooter situation. Consultation with your local law enforcement agency may be beneficial in conducting a security assessment of your facility. Many agencies are willing to assist churches in such an assessment and provide recommendations for improvement in security.

Planning
After the assessment is complete, develop an emergency plan for your organization to address the various threats identified in the assessment. In your plan, consider actions such as evacuation, shelter, lockdown, and how you will communicate with your congregation. Consider your security plan and the level of protection that you feel is appropriate for your location. For some churches, that may include the presence of off-duty law enforcement officers, armed professional security or trained volunteers.

GuideOne recommends two resources that can help your church prepare for such an event: GuideOne’s Sample Emergency Action and Recovery Plan for Religious Organizations and the federal government’s Developing High Quality Emergency Operation Plans for Houses of Worship

The recent terrorist attack serves as reminder for all organizations to be vigilant. Pay attention to the people entering and exiting your facility before, during and after services and special events, and heed this direction from the Department of Homeland Security: “if you see something, say something” to authorities. Additionally, take time to revisit your organization’s emergency plan and prepare for the various disaster scenarios that your church could potentially face.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Space, JD, ARM is the Director of Risk Management and Loss Control at GuideOne Insurance in West Des Moines, Iowa.  Before joining GuideOne, he served as Minister of Operations for a large Methodist church in Raleigh, N.C., and was a liability litigation trial attorney in Washington, D.C.

Join Us for a Free Webinar: Protect Your School and Campus Communities

// Lindsay Taylor on Tuesday March 28, 2017

School-related crime and violence is an ongoing hot topic, and it is more important than ever to ensure you are taking the proper measures to protect your students, staff and community members.

On Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at 2 p.m. Central Time, join GuideOne Insurance for a free webinar, “Protect Your School and Campus Communities.” Tune in as GuideOne Senior Risk Manager Brian Gleason discusses critical topics related to school and campus security. Key takeaways from the webinar include:

  • The current campus security climate
  • Techniques for responding to a dangerous situation
  • Resources to help you eliminate the threat of violence

You won’t want to miss out on this webinar. Register now to reserve your spot today.

If you are unable to attend, you may still register and we will send you a recording of the webinar shortly after it airs. 

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor

Lindsay Taylor is a Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on marketing communications and the co-op program.

In her free time, she enjoys dancing, running and spending time with friends and family.

Portable Space Heater Safety

// Katie Rynard on Thursday February 9, 2017

Portable electric space heaters come in handy when you’re trying to warm a specific room in your house or take the chill out of a drafty workspace. But if they’re not used properly, they can be more hazardous than helpful.

Portable and fixed space heaters are responsible for two of every five home heating fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association, and account for 84 percent of related civilian deaths.

That doesn’t mean you need to retire yours (after all, we still have several weeks of winter left – thanks, Punxsutawney Phil!) as long as you’re more mindful when using it. These tips from Electrical Safety Foundation International can help you extinguish the risk of fire and electric shock when you use a portable electric space heater:

  • Use a heater that’s certified by an independent testing laboratory, like Underwriters Laboratories (UL), Intertek (ETL) or Canadian Standards Association (CSA).
  • Check the heater for signs of damage before each use – and don’t use it if you spot anything suspicious. Red flags include cracked, frayed or broken plugs and loose connections.
  • Position the heater at least three feet away from anything that can burn, including papers, clothing and rugs. Keep children and pets away from it.
  • Place the heater on level, flat surfaces. Never put one on cabinets, tables, furniture or carpet, which can overheat and start a fire.
  • Locate your heater away from high-traffic areas and doorways where it may pose a tripping hazard.
  • Plug your heater directly into a wall outlet. Do not use an extension cord or power strip, which could overheat and result in a fire.
  • Do not plug any other electrical devices into the same outlet as the heater.
  • Never leave an operating space heater unattended. It should be turned off and unplugged at the end of the work day, when you leave the room or when you go to bed.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard

Katie Rynard is a Corporate Communications Specialist at GuideOne Insurance.

When she's not at work, she enjoys decorating, traveling, trying new restaurants and spending time with her husband, daughter and dachshund puppy.

Pages