Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

// Ellen Wade on Tuesday March 1, 2016

As defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, carbon monoxide (CO) is a “colorless, odorless, tasteless toxic gas produced by incomplete combustion in fuel-burning devices such as motor vehicles, gas-powered furnaces, and portable generators.” Poisoning of this kind can be fatal if it goes undetected, and is most prevalent during the cold winter months.  In fact, nearly half of all accidental carbon monoxide deaths occurring in the first three months of the year.

Review the following information to help minimize the risk of potential CO exposure.

Know the carbon monoxide warning signs and take action

  • If you experience flu-like symptoms (headache, nausea, dizziness, or confusion) and suspect carbon monoxide exposure, get fresh air immediately; and see a physician.
  • Have your home tested for carbon monoxide before returning to your house.
  • If the alarm on a carbon monoxide detector goes off, never ignore it. Get fresh air immediately, and call the local fire department or 911.

Install carbon monoxide detectors and keep them maintained

  • Carbon monoxide detectors should have an audible alarm and meet current guidelines, such as the Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL) standards. It also should carry a long-term warranty.
  • Experts recommend installing a carbon monoxide detector with an audible alarm inside your home and garage.
  • In the home, place a detector in the hallway as near as possible to the sleeping areas. For additional protection, also place a detector near the furnace.
  • Test your carbon monoxide detectors, and replace the batteries regularly according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Minimize Hazards
Each of the following is a potential source of carbon monoxide. Minimize hazards with regular inspections, service, and careful use:

  • Appliances: Clothes dryers, gas ranges, ovens.
    • Have qualified professionals install all appliances according to manufacturers’ instructions and local building codes.
    • Do not try to service fuel-burning appliances on your own without proper expertise.
    • Do not try to heat your home with an oven or gas range.
  • Heating systems: Fireplace, furnace, water heater, wood and coal-burning stoves, camp stoves and portable space heaters.
    • Once a year, have your home’s heating system (including furnace, chimney, flue and vents) inspected and serviced.
    • The furnace should have adequate intake of outside air.
    • The chimney and flue should be inspected for blockage, corrosion, and poor connections. (Also see this Chimney and Fireplace Safety resource.)
    • Do not burn charcoal inside of a home, garage, cabin, vehicle, or camper.
    • Do not use portable fuel-burning camp stove and other outside equipment inside a home, garage, tent, or camper.
    • Do not use portable kerosene and gas heaters without proper ventilation.
  • Gas-powered lawn mowers and tools: Do not operate a lawn mower or other gas-powered equipment in an enclosed area such as a garage or basement.
  • Running car engines: Do not leave a car or other vehicle running in the garage, even with the garage door open.

Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home, and check it regularly to ensure it is in working order, to help keep you and your family protected from carbon monoxide poisoning. 

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade is a Marketing Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on content marketing and social media.

In her free time, she enjoys running, biking, reading and exploring new cities.

Planning a Safe Valentine's Event

// Alexa Guessford on Thursday February 11, 2016

With Valentine’s Day just days away and love beginning to fill the air, events filled with x’s and o’s are all around us. Feb. 14 is a day to show your loved ones how much they truly mean to you, and what greater way to celebrate the day than with a Valentine’s event. However, with each holiday celebration, there are associated risks to consider. To ensure your festivity doesn’t turn into the disaster of the century, follow the safety tips and tricks below.

Decorations

Valentine’s Day naturally calls for paper hearts and candlelight, but the two don’t mix. Red and pink heart-shaped things should fill the room; however, open flames of any kind should not. In order to set the romantic vibe without the risk of burning the building down, try using flameless and LED candles. These come in a variety of shapes, scents and sizes, and are great for these types of events.

Food

Preparation

Whether you’re preparing for a potluck or individual party favors, serving food to a group of people can be stressful.

  • Wash your hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before handling any type of food.
  • All cooking utensils and surfaces should be cleaned with hot, soapy water before and in between using each food item.
  • Separate all raw, cooked and ready-to-eat foods while shopping, preparing, storing and serving. This helps to eliminate the transfer of bacteria.

Serving

  • When serving, hot foods should be kept at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or above, and cold foods at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
  • Disposable gloves should be used when handling ready-to-eat food without utensils.

Storing

  • Food should not be left out at room temperature for more than two hours (one hour if over 90 degrees Fahrenheit outside).
  • Hot foods should be refrigerated within two hours after cooking.

Allergies

With food allergies more prevalent than ever, it’s important to plan for and have options for people that cannot eat certain foods. Allergies and diets to consider include peanuts, tree nuts, milk (or dairy), eggs, wheat (gluten) and soy. As long as you have at least one option for each of the dietary needs, you’ll be good to go.

Activities

Whether you’re planning for two or an entire group, your Valentine’s activity should be suited for the ages of those involved. When considering a craft, stay away from those that may require hot glue guns, scissors (young children) and knives. You can search various activities and games that are age and size-of-group appropriate, and most importantly fun.

By taking safety precautions along the way, you will lessen your risk of an emergency situation. Happy Valentine’s Day!

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Alexa Guessford

Alexa Guessford

Alexa Guessford is the Corporate Communications Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance, mainly responsible for internal communications and special events.

In her spare time, Alexa enjoys working out, spending time with her family and watching Friends.

Candlelight Service Safety

// Natalie McCormick on Tuesday December 22, 2015

The holidays are a magical time of year.  It’s a time full of traditions, old and new, like caroling, hanging stockings or lining your neighborhood with luminaries.  If your church is like many across the United States, you will celebrate the season with a candlelight service.  As the room fills with twinkles of light, you’re reminded of the reason for the season.  The last thing you need is an injury, or worse, a fire, ruining the moment.  As you prepare for your service this week, remember these safety tips.

  • Candles should be placed in a sturdy, non-flammable candle holder.
  • Handheld candles should not be passed from one person to another at any time while lit.
  • When lighting candles, have the person with the unlit candle dip theirs into the flame of the lit candle.
  • Consider using battery-operated candles in place of once with wicks, especially for children.
  • If a battery-operated candle cannot be provided to a child, consider asking that the child share with his/her parent.
  • If wax is accidentally dripped onto skin, remove it quickly and run the burn under cold water.  If the burn is severe, consult your doctor immediately.
  • If any wax is dropped on the carpet or fabric; consider these steps for removal.
  • Equip your house of worship with a fire detection and sprinkler system and make sure it is properly maintained and in working order.

Your candlelight service is meant to be a peaceful and joyous time.  Consider these tips so that your traditions may continue for many years to come. 

 

Sources: NFPA

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

How to Safely Cut and Care for a Christmas Tree

// Natalie McCormick on Tuesday December 8, 2015

Christmas is right around the corner and there may be no holiday tradition as fulfilling as searching for the perfect tree.  If you’re like 30 million other Americans you will purchase a real tree this year.  If you’re the one cutting down the tree, it’s important to know what you’re doing so that you don’t hurt yourself or anyone around you.  Follow these tips before you go Christmas tree hunting.

Prepare
Before you trudge through the snow to find your perfect pine, consider the following:

  • What size of tree do you need?  Make sure you measure the space you plan to put the tree in and measure the tree before you start cutting.  It also may be important for you to measure the doorway through which you plan to bring the tree. 
  • Can I legally cut down this tree?  If you are headed into open land for a tree, make sure you to check with your municipal, county or state government about a permit.  If you’re headed to a Christmas tree farm, you’re safe. 
  • Do I have the right tools?  Bring a thick pair of gloves, an ax or bucksaw, and a means of getting your tree home.  Evergreen trees can be messy too, so be sure to bring a tarp to wrap the tree in.

Cut
You’ve found the perfect tree, and now it’s time to get chopping.  Consider the following:

  • Leave the tree a foot or two longer than you need it.  This way you can trim the bottom branches of the tree when you get it home if you’d like.
  • Your tree will fall to the side in which you are cutting, so be sure there is no one in its path.
  • Use your ax or saw to cut through the tree at a slight angle, and then push it onto the ground when it’s almost cut through. 
  • Once it’s cut, have a friend or family member help carry it to your vehicle and secure it. 

Care
Your tree has made its way safely to your home, and now it’s time to care for it. 

  • Trim the bottom of the trunk at a slight angle using a saw.  Make an inch-wide cut to expose a fresh part of the trunk that will take up water more readily.
  • Use a stand that will hold a large amount of water, and water the tree regularly.
  • Mount the tree in the stand and fasten it so that it’s sturdy.
  • Make sure to take down your tree before it dries out as it can become a fire hazard.

 

 

Sources: Popular Mechanics

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Slips and Falls: Hazards, Impact and Prevention

// Taylor Vivant on Tuesday December 1, 2015

While you may be regularly taking precautions to protect your organization, are you doing all you can to prevent injuries to your members or visitors? Slips and falls are a leading cause of claims, and they can be quite costly. Review the infographic below for information regarding slips and fall hazards, the impact they cause and prevention tips. See where your organization can make a change to ensure the individuals in and around your facility are safe. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant is a member of the Corporate Communications and Marketing team at GuideOne Insurance, where she assists in a variety of projects and tasks.

Away from work, she enjoys being active outdoors, adventuring with her friends and planning her next vacation.

Start Winterizing Your Home Today

// Natalie McCormick on Thursday November 19, 2015

During the winter, nothing is better than escaping from the frosty tundra to your warm and cozy home, but that jovial feeling can be quickly overshadowed when you receive your energy bill at the end of the month.

Your solution may be to avoid thinking about the impending snow and ice altogether, but with a little preparation, you may save yourself a headache and some money by preparing your home for the frigid temperatures now.  Check out the tips below for winterizing your home and saving a little money in the process.

  1. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, drafts can waste 5 percent to 30 percent of your energy use.  Save yourself some money and place a rolled towel or draft snake under outside doors.
  2. Clean your gutters so water can flow freely to prevent ice buildup in the winter.
  3. Don’t forget to change your furnace filter once a month.  A dirty filter will restrict air flow and therefore increase energy demand, which can attribute to a higher energy bill.
  4. Flush your water heater to clear out sediment that can collect over time.
  5. Run your ceiling fans in reverse to circulate warm air back to the ground.
  6. Make it part of your routine to turn down the heat when you leave for the day.  For every degree you lower your thermostat, you’ll save between 1 percent to 3 percent of your heating bill.
  7. Install window plastic to guard against window drafts and help your home hold heat.


Your home is a place of safety and warmth.  Keep it protected from the harsh winter cold this season and all year round.  Check out our Around the Home Pinterest Board for tips, tricks and DIYs.

 

 

 

Sources: Bob Vila, Popular Mechanics

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Starting a Safety and Security Team

// Eric Spacek, JD, ARM on Thursday November 5, 2015

Whether you’re a church that’s long established, or a new church gathering members and finding a place to worship, having a Risk Management Team oversee the safety and security of your church is important.

Instead of various groups spending time dealing with each of the key risk management issues that a church faces, a Risk Management Team can look at risk comprehensively and formulate a plan that best fits your ministry and membership.  By forming a quality safety and security team, the chances of maintaining a safe and secure environment increase dramatically. Read on to learn how to structure and organize your risk management team.

Team Structure

  • Your team should include between three and eight members. They may include current or former law enforcement officers; current or former military personnel; those who have a background in insurance, claims or risk management; facility managers, and others who feel strongly about a proactive risk management program.
  • The team should be endorsed and officially formed by action of the church's administrative body. Once established, they should meet at least on a quarterly basis.
  • All ongoing activities, new ministries, special events, and building upgrades and construction should be filtered through the committee.
  • Regular activity reports should be given to the church staff and administrative body.

Team Organization

  • Educate: The team should obtain resources and seek training to become informed on key elements and responses of church risk management. The team should then educate the church board and staff members.
  • Plan and Respond: As a team, begin developing a security plan that includes initial congregational education, inspections, activity protocols, and policies.
  • Train and Inform Others: Begin a congregation-wide educational program on safety, security, and risk issues. Speak to small groups, key committees, and other members to keep them informed and receive their input on key safety issues and implementation.
  • Follow Through: Develop a strategy for slowly phasing in a risk management program, as well as the ongoing monitoring, and an educational emphasis. The goal is to integrate safety and security measures into the daily life of the congregation without compromising the church’s ministry.

For more information on risk management and areas your safety team should consider, view these additional church safety resources from the GuideOne Center for Risk Management.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Space, JD, ARM is the Director of Risk Management and Loss Control at GuideOne Insurance in West Des Moines, Iowa.  Before joining GuideOne, he served as Minister of Operations for a large Methodist church in Raleigh, N.C., and was a liability litigation trial attorney in Washington, D.C.

Should You Offer Free Wi-Fi at Church?

// Ellen Wade on Tuesday October 20, 2015

Most people today have at least one smart device, using them to stay connected wherever they go.  To help make this easier for consumers, many businesses are now granting access to their own Wi-Fi networks so people can continue to use their devices without paying for data.

From coffee shops to hotels to your local fast food joint, consumers have come to expect free Wi-Fi will be available to them wherever they go.  And, the want to stay connected doesn’t end when they walk through the doors of your church. While some may want access to the network in order to stay up any emails that come in, many will use it to follow along and supplement your message.  

There are pros and cons to offering Wi-Fi access during service, outlined below. However, there are solutions you can put in place to overcome these obstacles, and make it safer to have Wi-Fi available to all who enter your church, should you choose to do so.

Pros:

  • Stay connected to the church.  Many churches today have a strong social media presence, and staff and congregation members alike are beginning to live tweet the message, or share images and videos. 
  • Follow along with the message easily. Attendees can look up related scriptures and readings with a Bible app, or jot down notes and other items they want to remember through notetaking apps.  In addition, they’ll be able to easily review any corresponding sermon materials that the church has made available.
  • Promote your location through geo-tracking.  Location tracking gives a user the ability to check in at your location, letting others know they are a part of your congregation, and subtly inviting their followers to join them.
  • Enrich the overall experience someone has at the church. Offering free Wi-Fi is a nice value-add and gives attendees the feeling that the church is an open and welcoming place. 

Cons:

  • Without proper protection, someone connected to the Wi-Fi could gain access to private church information, including bank numbers and financials.
  • People could use the network to illegally download pirated music, movies, etc.
  • People could use the network to download or stream inappropriate content.
  • Additional people connected to your network could cause the network to slow and disrupt church business.

Solutions:

  • Protect business computers and private church files by creating a separate network for guests.  In addition, add another layer of security by password protecting administrative computers.  Have a set length of time passwords need to be changed, like every 30 or 60 days, and use a strong password.
  • Change the password frequently on your guest network.  Some churches will change it every Sunday to help increase the chances that only attendees will have access to the network.  This also helps ensure that someone who has never attended the church won’t be able to access and use the network for something the church wouldn’t support, like streaming inappropriate videos.
  • Require users to agree to the church’s terms of service before granting them access to your guest network.  An Internet usage policy could help dissuade users from using the network for anything illegal.
  • Block inappropriate content or websites from being accessed on your network by using a content blocker or content filter.  Free and for-cost options are available.

Ultimately, it is up to your organization to decide if making a guest Wi-Fi network available is worth the added risk.  If you decide the pros outweigh the cons, speak with a local IT/Security professional to discuss solutions and how you can safely offer free Wi-Fi at your organization.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade is a Marketing Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on content marketing and social media.

In her free time, she enjoys running, biking, reading and exploring new cities.

Decorate Your Home Safely this Holiday Season

// Natalie McCormick on Thursday October 15, 2015

We’re in the final stretch of the year and that means month after month of holidays and the décor that goes with them.  Whether you’re throwing a Halloween bash, Thanksgiving brunch or Christmas soiree, it’s important to keep safety in mind while you’re decorating this season.  Check out the tips below to avoid any Clark Griswold-like disasters as you’re getting in the holiday spirit.

  • Check each set of lights you plan to use for broken or cracked sockets, frayed wires or loose connections.  Discard any damaged sets prior to using them.
  • Securely fasten any outdoor lighting to protect it from wind.
  • Don’t overload your extension cords.  Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord.
  • Before going to bed, turn off all decorative lights.  Lights can short and start fires.
  • Place trees and all decorations away from heating sources, including fireplaces and radiators. 
  • Keep candles out of high traffic areas to help keep them from being knocked down or blown over.
  • Choose materials that are made from plastic or non-leaded metals.  Leaded materials are hazardous if ingested.
  • If you have small children or pets, avoid decorations that are sharp or easily broken.
  • If you’re carving a pumpkin, carve in a clean, dry and well-lit area to avoid any accidents.

For holiday decorating ideas for your home, check out our Pinterest page for inspiration.

 

 

Sources: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Consumer Reports

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Noble Actions When Facing a Protest

// Taylor Vivant on Tuesday October 13, 2015

When you think of measures to take to protect your organization, you might think of property insurance, securing the building, or implementing policies that protect visitors and members from hazards. Seldom do leaders think of protests as a threat to their mission.

Unfortunately, religious protests are more common these days, and you never know when you’ll be at odds with an activist group. When preparing your emergency action plans, be sure to consider how you would handle a protest were it to occur at your organization.

Protests can be hard to handle as an organization. Demonstrators are trying to call attention to something they see as an issue, and they want to be heard. It’s a sensitive situation for everyone involved. However, when it comes to defending yourself, the best option is to practice the “avoid and ignore” approach, giving little attention to the protesting group. Without engagement or conversation, protestors may lose motivation.

Consider these tips when preparing for the possibility of a protest:

  • First, you should understand your local laws regarding private property and trespassing. Research the laws for your jurisdiction and learn your rights as a property owner.
  • Local law enforcement is there to help you. Ask them for guidance or helpful information regarding how to handle a protest situation. Additionally, keep them informed of any rumors or actual protests, as it could benefit your organization during the time of a protest. 
  • While protestors may be trespassing on your property, you still want to ensure there are no hazards in their demonstration area, such as depressions or holes. Analyze the condition of your property before a protest and keep records of your findings. Having video footage or photographs offer proof that demonstrators were in a hazard-free area. If you do find hazards, post warning signs to identify them, and make repairs where necessary. Doing so may help you avoid having a lawsuit, and maybe a protest as well. 
  • Stay true to your mission, be consistent in your communications and remain focused on your own organization. 
  • Transparency is important to your staff, volunteers, members, visitors, etc. They have a legitimate interest in things happening around your organization. Therefore, it is important to keep them informed of items regarding a potential protest, including the reason behind the protest, instructions on how to access your facility during such an event, and advice on how to employ the “avoid and ignore” approach. 
  • To further emphasize “avoid and ignore,” consider utilizing a buffer. This person should be a recognized leader among the organization, and will serve as protection for both sides of the protest. This person also should help encourage members and visitors to use the “avoid and ignore” strategy. 

Stay calm through the entire duration of this situation. Those watching the protest will be more impressed with your handling of it than the message the demonstrators stand for. Protests are never easy to handle for any organization. However, with proper precautions and preparation, you may be able to reach a more positive end result. 

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant

Taylor Vivant is a member of the Corporate Communications and Marketing team at GuideOne Insurance, where she assists in a variety of projects and tasks.

Away from work, she enjoys being active outdoors, adventuring with her friends and planning her next vacation.

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