National Preparedness Month – Wildfire Prevention

// Natalie McCormick on Tuesday September 8, 2015

“Wildfires Have Now Burned a Massive 8 Million Acres across the US”

“Large Wildfires More Common and Destructive in the West”

“Monster Wildfire Season Grips West Coast Residents with Fears of Future Devastation”

If you briefly skim today’s news headlines you’ll likely see something like the ones above.  As wildfires rage on the west coast, it’s an important time for your organization and community to brush up on wildfire prevention.  In honor of National Preparedness month here are some tips for preparing your organization and home before, during and after a wildfire. 

 

Before

  • Build an emergency kit full of basic items your organization or home may need in the event of an emergency.
  • Make a communication plan for contacting family members or other loved ones.
  • Be sure to have working fire alarms on every level of your building or home.  Try to have them checked monthly and change the batteries once a year.
  • Keep your lawn and grounds rid of leaves and twigs.  If there is a wildfire nearby, these can easily catch fire and spread.
  • ​For more information on how to prepare for a wildfire, visit Firewise.com.

During

  • Listen to the authorities and evacuate immediately upon their request.
  • If you see a wildfire and are unsure it’s been reported, call 911.
  • If you have not been asked to evacuate and have time, fill outdoor tubs, pools and garbage cans with water.  You may even place valuables that cannot be damaged by water in one of these to help keep them protected.
  • Place important documents inside the vehicle you would evacuate in.  If you have pets, have their supplies packed and in the vehicle as well.  This way you are ready to get in the car and leave should you be asked to evacuate.
  • Shut off any natural gas or propane at the source.
  • Turn on outdoor and indoor lights.  This way your home or building is more likely to be seen in heavy smoke.

After

  • If you evacuated your home or building, do not return until fire officials say it’s safe.
  • Use caution when entering burned areas as threats may still persist.
  • If you’ve been cleared to return to your home or building and once the fire has passed, check the roof and attic immediately.  If there are any sparks or embers, put them out.
  • Wet debris down to minimize breathing dust particles.
  • Do not use water from the faucet unless emergency officials have said it’s okay.
  • Be on a “fire watch” for several hours after the fire.  If you see smoke or sparks, see if you can put them out, and if not, call 911.

If you’re interested in more information about how to prepare your organization and home from wildfires visit Ready.gov/wildfires

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

5 Tips for Protecting Yourself and Your Home from Lightning Strikes

// Natalie McCormick on Thursday July 9, 2015

In less than a microsecond, a lightning strike can produce heat five times hotter than the surface of the sun.  While this is quite remarkable, it also is very dangerous.  About one in 200 homes are struck by lightning each year, resulting in torched homes and even injury. As a matter of fact, lightning was responsible for $674 million in homeowners insurance losses in 2013.

In honor of Lightning Safety Awareness week, here are some suggestions for protecting yourself and your home from lightning strikes.

  1. Have a professional install a certified lightning protection system. This system is made up of a series of components:
    • Air terminals (also known as lightning rods)
    • Main conductors
    • Grounds – A minimum of two ground rods, driven at least 10 feet deep is suggested.
    • Bonds
    • Surge arresters and suppressors – These prevent the entrance of overvoltages, which can lead to fire.
  2. Consider having a lightning protection system installed on any trees taller than or within 10 feet of the home.
  3. Follow the “30-30” rule.  When you see lightning flash, count the number of seconds until you hear thunder.  If you hear thunder in 30 seconds or less, the storm is close enough to be dangerous.  If you aren’t already somewhere safe that’s your cue to get there. After the storm ends, stay in your safe place for at least 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.
  4. Unplug all electronics in the house, including landline telephones. While surge protectors offer some protection, they may not protect you and your home should it be hit with a direct lightning strike.
  5. Avoid taking a bath or using the shower as water pipes conduct electricity.  

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Your Ultimate Picnic Basket Checklist

// Natalie McCormick on Tuesday June 30, 2015

Who doesn’t love a good picnic?  It’s a great way to celebrate the beautiful weather summer brings.   Though, what’s not fun is sitting down to enjoy your picnic and realizing you’ve forgotten an essential item.  But, never fear, I’ve compiled a checklist of picnic essentials and safety tips so that your picnic in the park, on the beach, or at a campground goes off without a hitch.  

Packing List

Safety Tips

  • Keep any perishable foods cold (40 degrees Fahrenheit or below) by transporting them in a cooler filled with ice or ice packs.  Perishable foods include meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, pasta, rice, cooked vegetables, and peeled and cut fruits.
  • Research ahead of time to determine if your picnic site has a source of safe drinking water.  If not, be sure to pack water for drinking and cleaning.
  • If you plan to grill, be sure raw meat and poultry are wrapped securely to prevent their juices from cross-contaminating other foods in the cooler.
  • Don’t use the same utensils or serving dish for raw and cooked meat.  Choose disposable plates and utensils to prevent cross-contamination.
  • If you’re grilling or cooking food while at your picnic site, be sure your food is kept hot, at or above 140 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Consider packing non-perishable food items, like potato chips instead of potato salad and whole fruit instead of fruit salad. 

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Easter Service Safety

// Eric Spacek, JD, ARM on Thursday April 2, 2015

Easter is one of the busiest days on the church calendar, and with the holiday just a few short days away, now is a good time to begin preparations if you haven’t already done so.

Most churches will have larger attendance numbers this weekend and will host numerous activities, including additional services, Easter egg hunts, and maybe even an Easter brunch or other holiday meal.  With all of these extra events going on during this big upcoming weekend, it is important to review your safety and risk management procedures. Consider the suggestions and tips below for keeping members, visitors and staff safe.

  • Parking Lot and Walking Surfaces – Make sure parking lots, sidewalks and other walking surfaces are in good condition. Look for any potential hazards, such as pot holes, loose handrails or inadequate lighting. This will reduce the risk of potential trips and falls. Also ensure that speed bumps, parking stops and curbs are vividly marked with a contrasting paint color.
  • Volunteers and Security – Any security, off-duty officers or volunteer parking lot attendants being utilized during the weekend should wear bright and reflective clothing to increase their visibility. Directing traffic and assisting pedestrians can help reduce chaos and prevent any confusion. Outside security should look for any suspicious activity and quickly communicate any concerns. Also, be sure that your indoor security and ushers are following proper procedures.
  • Emergencies – Prior to the weekend, review all fire or other disaster evacuation plans and emergency protocol.  Be sure all First Aid kits are stocked and, if applicable, defibrillators have been checked.
  • Nurseries and Sunday School Rooms – Inspect children’s areas for any dangers, such as unprotected electrical outlets, unsecured supply cabinets or unanchored furniture. The busy weekend can bring in a large influx of children, so make sure you have an adequate number of staff scheduled. 
  • Decorations and Special Performances – There is a long history and tradition behind having lit candles in church.  However, using them opens the church to risk for a potentially devastating fire.  If you use lit candles as Easter decorations, or plan a special performance that includes lit candles or other exposed flames, make sure they are kept away from flammable materials and never left unsupervised.  In addition, make sure you have the correct fire extinguisher on hand in case an emergency occurs. 

From all of us here at GuideOne Connections, we wish you a safe and happy Easter.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Spacek, JD, ARM

Eric Space, JD, ARM is the Director of Risk Management and Loss Control at GuideOne Insurance in West Des Moines, Iowa.  Before joining GuideOne, he served as Minister of Operations for a large Methodist church in Raleigh, N.C., and was a liability litigation trial attorney in Washington, D.C.

4 Keys to a Safe and Successful Easter Egg Hunt

// Ellen Wade on Thursday March 26, 2015

In just 10 short days, many people will be celebrating Easter.  As the unofficial start of Spring, this holiday can be a great way for your organization to reach out to the community.

One traditional Easter activity to host is an Easter egg hunt.  This type of event allows the community to come together in a safe and fun environment, as well as allows your organization to do some outreach in a non-threatening atmosphere. 

While this type of event is fun for the participants, proper planning is key to help ensure a safe event.  Consider these four main factors when planning an Easter egg hunt to help avoid potential safety concerns:

  1. Event Location – Whether you’re hosting the event on site at your facility or at an off-site location, make sure you pre-inspect the area for any concerns.  Check for spots that are uneven, holes in the ground or any other safety issues.
  2. Hiding Locations – While there’s a desire to make egg hiding spots difficult and challenging, make sure safety is the number one concern.  Hide eggs in locations that could not pose any danger to a child and are away from electrical outlets or breakable items.
  3. Use of Employees and Volunteers – Egg hunts can become chaotic with so much excitement among children. Utilize employees and volunteers to supervise the egg hunt and ensure that children remain in safe areas during the activity.
  4. Egg Contents – If your organization is using plastic eggs in your hunt, consider food allergies and choking hazards when selecting the egg contents.  And, while candy inside the eggs is always a crowd pleaser, if you’re looking for a few inexpensive non-candy items to use in the eggs, here is a great list.

Have fun with the community this Easter holiday by planning a great, and safe, event.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade is a Marketing Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on content marketing and social media.

In her free time, she enjoys running, biking, reading and exploring new cities.

Spring Break Mission Trip Travel Safety

// Natalie McCormick on Tuesday March 10, 2015

It’s arguably one of the best times of year.  Spring break!  It’s a chance for those of us in cold climates to thaw out by heading south or to just take a quick break from school or work.  For churches, spring break presents a great opportunity to participate in a mission trip.  While these trips are fun, valuable and spiritual experiences, it’s important to recognize the risks involved while traveling in or out of country.  Here are some ways you can prepare for those risks. 

Research & Plan – Prior to your trip, research the possible health risks, dangers and cultural norms of the location you’re headed to.  If you’ll be visiting a foreign country, look into any immunizations, laws or customs your group should be aware of.

Meet Up – Schedule group meetings prior to your departure.  Ask that your entire travel group attend, and brief them on what you’ve learned from your research and planning.  

Heed the Warnings – Take any travel warnings seriously.  There are many parts of the world that may be too dangerous for your ministry.  If there is an area that you want to help but has been deemed dangerous for travel, consider a form of outreach that doesn’t place your members at risk such as a special missions offering or item donation collection.  Important travel information can be found on the U.S. Department of State website

Develop Guidelines – By developing guidelines for your trip, you will help reduce the risks for trip participants.  Make sure all travelers and their families are aware of the trip rules and outcomes for not following them.  Here is a quick list of guidelines to consider when planning your trip:

  • Select requirements for travelers, such as age, health and experience;
  • Conduct background checks on traveling adults and determine their duties for the trip;
  • Decide what kinds of documents travelers must provide prior to the trip;
  • Designate a contact person, not on the trip, who will communicate between the church, the travelers and their family members;
  • Have each traveler receive a physical examination from their physician, including any needed immunizations and prescriptions, at least six weeks before the trip; and
  • Establish procedures for emergency situations.

Travel Safe – If your group is driving to the service destination, be sure to consider alternatives to 12 or 15 passenger vans.  Mini-buses or coach buses may provide a safer alternative.  License requirements, driving rules and customs can vary widely by country, so be prepared.  And just because you are out of the country does not mean relaxing safety rules, such as the use of seat belts.

Be Alert & Be Smart – While in an unfamiliar area be continuously aware of your surroundings.  

  • Note safe locations;
  • Never travel alone. There is safety in numbers;
  • Do not count or display money in public;
  • Use ATMs in banks or other secure locations and be aware of anyone watching you;
  • Do not wear or display expensive or expensive-looking jewelry;
  • Never leave your personal items or luggage unattended;
  • Don’t share personal, travel, or housing details with strangers; and
  • Trust your instincts.  If you feel uncomfortable, remove yourself and others from the situation. 

A mission trip should be a memorable and impactful experience.  To help you and the rest of your group enjoy your time, consider all of the risk factors when preparing for your trip.  Also, don’t forget to check with your insurance agent on Mission Trip Insurance, which could cover exposures like foreign travel liability and foreign auto liability. 

Sources: Travel Safety

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Halloween Hacks

// Natalie McCormick on Thursday October 30, 2014

Tip and tricks for keeping your Halloween safe and fun for the kiddos.

Halloween can be a spooky and fun time of year filled with pumpkins, fake spider webs and, of course, candy.  If you’re venturing out to trick-or-treat with your kids this year keep in mind these helpful tips and tricks for staying safe, healthy and having fun!

  • Lighten Up – Choose a light colored costume. These are more easily seen at night.  You also can add reflective or glow-in-the-dark tape/stickers to a costume. Costumes like a robot or astronaut easily lend themselves to these items but even your princess wand or candy bucket can glow in the dark!
  • Unmask – Choose face paint or makeup over a mask whenever possible.  Masks can obstruct your child’s vision and breathing. Make sure to test the makeup or paint on your child’s arm or hand before applying; in case it irritates the skin.
  • Glow – Give your child a flashlight or glow sticks to carry with him/her.  This makes it easier for your child to see and for him or her to be seen by others.
  • Fits Like a Glove – When choosing your child’s costume, make sure to pick one that fits well to prevent trips and falls.
  • Hi, My Name Is – Place a nametag somewhere on your child’s costume with your contact information.  While you’re not likely to get separated, it’s a good precaution to take in case you do.
  • Keep ‘Em Close – If you have older children that you won’t be joining for trick-or-treat, decide on a route ahead of time with them and set a curfew for when they’ll be coming home.  In addition, make sure they have a cell phone with them and only go to houses in the neighborhood with porch lights on.
  • Inspection – When your kids are home, check all of their treats and toss out any that have come unwrapped.  Also consider throwing out homemade treats that didn’t come from someone you know.
  • Feast – Before the festivities, make sure to have a filling meal with your family.  This way your kids are less likely to gobble down too many of their goodies.
  • Alternative Treats – Here’s a great list of ways to celebrate Halloween without the candy.  Also, offer your children and other trick-or-treaters treats that aren’t candy such as, stickers, coloring books, glow sticks or pencils
  • Get in on the Fun – Join your children under the age of 12 going door-to-door.  Don’t be shy about dressing up either. There are tons of pairs you could emulate: Dorothy and Toto, Frankenstein and a Mad Scientist, Princess and the Frog, Fisherman and his Big Catch.
  • Ration the Loot – Consider being lenient about candy eating on Halloween, but after discuss allowing one or two treats a day rather than letting them sample at will.  You may even consider giving some of the treats away.
  • Safe Haven – If you’re planning to hand out treats, make sure your sidewalks are clear, turn on your lights and make sure any pets are contained in another room or somewhere where they can’t frighten a child.

Do you have a creative treat you hand out, a clever costume hack or a fool-proof safety tip for trick-or-treat?  If so, share those with us on our Facebook page! 

 

Sources: Safe Kids Worldwide, Kids Health, Mayo Clinic

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick

Natalie McCormick is the Marketing Coordinator for GuideOne Insurance where she manages the direct mail program and assists with content marketing. 

When she's not at work she enjoys playing volleyball as well as perusing the local farmer's market.  If you can't find her outside you may find her inside reading a good book or baking a new recipe.

Trunk-or-Treating: 10 Tips to Help You Plan a Successful Event

// Ellen Wade on Thursday October 23, 2014

The best part about Halloween is the candy, whether it’s helping you get through the scary movie your friend drug you to, the reward you’ll receive once you make it through that never-ending, cheesy haunted house, or the little gift you’ll give yourself after the kids are finally in bed after an evening filled with costumes, bad jokes and sugar highs.

Many organizations are now offering members of their communities a safer alternative to the traditional trick-or-treating, an event called Trunk-or-Treating.  During this event, adult members of the organization volunteer to decorate the trunks of their vehicles in Halloween-themed décor and pass out candy or other goodies to the children in their community.  This is a safer alternative because the event is often held in a parking lot, or other well-lit, contained area, and children are at less of a risk of being hit by a vehicle on a dark road.  It also allows families a chance to chat and get to know one another, and is a great way for your organization to get their name out in the community and raise awareness for your cause.

If your organization is considering holding a trunk-or-treat event this year, consider the following:

Guidelines

Have your board members or event volunteer committee discuss how the activity will be organized and what guidelines will need to be followed.  Some items to consider include:

  • Participants – Discuss whether or not anyone in the community can sign up to have a vehicle on-sight, or if only organization members will be allowed to participate in handing out candy.
  • Attendees – Decide who will be invited to your event. Will you allow only organization members and their families? The entire community?  Will there be a fee to participate, or will it be a free event?
  • Date – Will your event be held during regular trick-or-treating hours, or on a different day as to not compete?  Will you hold the event early in the evening to avoid the dark and colder temperatures?
  • Protocol for decorations – Will you allow candles or any other sort of flammable objects?  Will fake blood be allowed?
  • Food safety and allergy concerns – One in 13 children has a food allergy, so this needs to be addressed when you are discussing your event.  Will you allow homemade items to be passed out, or only store-bought, pre-packaged items?  Will you sell food and/or beverages during your event?
  • Building Security – If you are on-site at your facility, decide if the building will be open or locked during the event.  Will participants have access to the restrooms, the entire building or nothing at all?  If the building is open, consider having a volunteer monitor traffic to and from the building.

Once you have determined these guidelines, make sure they are clearly communicated to all who are volunteering and participating in the event.

Safety Concerns During the Event

Once you have your event mapped out, consider safety issues that may arise during the event itself:

Falls – Falls are the number one cause of unintentional injuries on Halloween. While this is more in your control if you are at your own facility, it’s important that the parking lot is safe regardless of who owns it.   Help ensure everyone has a fun time by inspecting the grounds for fall hazards, including parking lot, sidewalks, curbs, grassy areas, potholes, or any other hazard that may be hidden due to dim lighting.  To learn more about potential slips, trips and fall hazards, and preparing your parking lot, review this fact sheet.

Inclement Weather – Have a back-up plan if the weather is not ideal for an outdoor event – snow, rain, extreme cold.  Especially for younger children, Halloween costumes can be thin and not cold or winter weather-friendly.  If possible, have a plan for moving the event indoors if necessary, or schedule a rain date.  Watch the weather, and communicate any event changes as far in advance as possible.

Traffic – The benefit of hosting the event in an enclosed area is that the risk of children running into traffic is much lower.  However, there still will be vehicles moving in and out of the parking lot, as people come and go.  Have a volunteer directing traffic to help ensure there is a flow to vehicles entering and exiting the parking lot.  Also, have a designated walking area for children moving around the parking lot to help keep traffic flow away from that area.

First Aid – Due to the large number of people that will hopefully be attending your event, consider having a volunteer on site that is trained to administer care in the event there is an accident.  Also, have a First Aid kit handy for minor emergencies.

Prevent your Halloween event from feeling more like Fright Night by properly preparing for the activity.  Trunk-or-Treating events can be fun for all ages, and can be a great way for your organization to raise awareness for your cause.  Avoid putting a damper on the evening of fun and sugar by being thoroughly prepared for any issue.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade is a Marketing Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on content marketing and social media.

In her free time, she enjoys running, biking, reading and exploring new cities.

Infographic: What are the chances I'll use auto insurance?

// Ellen Wade on Saturday August 30, 2014

Did you know that there are more than 10 million auto accidents each year? Or that 75% of all costs associated with an accident are paid by those not directly involved in the accident? If you are an uncovered or undercovered driver, there are many reasons you should reconsider your auto insurance protection.

What are the chances you'll need auto insurance? Check out our handy infographic for some stats that may surprise you. (Click to enlarge.)

If you're inspired to learn more about how auto insurance can help you, we would be happy to discuss your options. It's fast. It's free. And it's no obligation. Give us a call at 1-888-748-4326 or visit www.GuideOneIsWithYou.com.

This material is for information only and is not intended to provide legal or professional advice. You are encouraged to consult with your own attorney or other expert consultants for a professional opinion specific to your situation. This information is only a general description of the available coverages and is not a contract. In an effort to keep your policy coverage affordable, the actual policy contains certain limitations and exclusion. Please refer to your insurance policy for the pertinent contract language and coverages. Some coverages and discounts are not available in all states. GuideOne welcomes all applications, without regard to religion, race, color, national origin, sex, handicap or familial status.

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade

Ellen Wade is a Marketing Specialist for GuideOne Insurance, focusing on content marketing and social media.

In her free time, she enjoys running, biking, reading and exploring new cities.

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